How Much Money Does a CNA Make? How Does That Compare to Other Careers?

The age old question of pay—it’s definitely something to consider when you’re looking at different professions and trying to decide what’s best for you. Sure, it’s not the only consideration, but it is something that you need to think about, because you need to earn enough money to live off of and to pay for things that you need. Of course, most people know it’s not a good idea to choose a career solely based on your passions in life, but you don’t want to pick a career that pays well but is completely boring. So how do you find a good balance? Well, you have to explore your own passions, do some research, and try to strike a happy medium. Those looking to be a CNA are in luck if they are passionate about helping other people because CNAs typically earn a good wage or salary.

The amount of money that you can earn as a CNA varies depending upon what part of the country you live in. For example, someone who is working as a CNA in New York City or Los Angeles will earn more than a person working as a CNA in rural Idaho or Nebraska. The reason for this is mostly due to the cost of living associated with these cities. Obviously it cost much more to rent an apartment in Manhattan, NY vs Boise, Idaho or Omaha, NE, so employers have to pay CNAs more in certain cities, and they also charge the patients more for their services.

On average according to the BLS, Certified Nursing Assistants in the US earn about $12 per hour. If you want to know what the salary would be, then just multiply this times the amount of hours that your salary would be for in a year. Keep in mind that these numbers vary by city, state, and even region, so you can earn dramatically different wages in different areas. Where you work can also affect how much you earn. For example, if you work for a hospital, you may earn a higher or lower wage than if you work in a nursing home or private care setting. When you’re trying to figure out how much you’ll make, do as much research as possible, and you should be able to come up with a pretty good estimate.

Source: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/nursing-assistants.htm